Why Organic Apples?

Long before I became more conscious about what’s consume in my home, one thing that was never purchased was conventional apples. If those red shiny apples are not organic, I don’t want them. There’s a few foods I’m willing to buy that are not organic, for example bananas and avocados.

Why non-organic apples are a no-no?

Year after year, apples are consistently in the USDA’s top-10 list of the most contaminated fruits. Even after being washed, cored, and peeled, an average conventionally grown apple contains detectable residue from 4 to 10 different pesticides known or suspected to cause nervous-system damage, cancer, and hormone interference. Isn’t that crazy?

Apples are vulnerable to a number of insects getting into them and destroying it. To fight pests, non-organic apples are sprayed with insecticides several times during the growth season, and are often sprayed after harvest with fungicides or petroleum sprays.  If we eat conventional apples we are also consuming such pesticides. I prefer to pay a few cents more and eat something nutritious rather than harmful. Also peeled apples are still filled with toxins and if apples are not eaten with the peel , you just lost most of the fruits fiber. Which to me, makes no sense. Next time you’re in the produce section of your supermarket, think about which apples you want to take a bite out of.

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3 comments

  1. Not to mention about half an inch of candle wax put on it to make them shine brighter, then markets wonder why everyone’s turning to organic farm growers that make them so much more juicy and fresh tasting huh?

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